Home > Yorkshire > Thomas Remembrancer

Thomas of Appleton and Westminster c 1370-1435

Thomas Broket established a land-owning dynasty that lasted 275 years. Born into a parish-gentry clan he rose to county and then national level. He became Lord of a manor near York c 1393 through marriage to the heiress. By 1399 he was working in the Exchequer at Westminster as a Clerk, and as an Attorney soon after, if not before. Then in 1410 he was appointed Lord Treasurer's Remembrancer. This brought him wealth through grants from the king, such that he could arrange a marriage for his son Thomas to a yet wealthier heiress in Hertfordshire, rebuild the manor in Appleton and endow its parish church with a Lady Chapel, probably a chantry to his perpetual memory.

  Contents of this page: 1. Early years 5. Attorney at the Exchequer  
    2. Marriage and arms 6. Treasurer's Remembrancer  
    3. Children 7. Grants and Mainprises  
    4. Life and work in Yorkshire 8. Death and burial  

 

1. Early years

Assuming he married by 1393, Thomas would have been born no later than 1373, and probably some years earlier. A man's age at marriage could have been as low as 20 in the 14th C, especially in richer families, (Razi 1986 pp 50-64 & 70), but Thomas' parents are not definitely known. Assuming further that Thomas was from the Ainsty rather than the City, 1363 would have been his earliest year of birth—he didn't pay poll tax in the Ainsty in 1379, the eligible age for which was 16. If he was born in York we do not know the earliest date. The 1377 poll tax for the City might have recorded his parents, but only half of it survives (Leggett 1971 p 131). Had he been 25 or more in 1385 he may well have been a deponent in the Controversy between Sir Richard Scrope and Sir Robert Grosvenor (Nicolas 1832).

Date Event Age if born 1364 Age if born 1373
By 1393
Marriage
29 20
Before 1400
Attorney at the Exchequer
35 26
1410
Appointment as Treasurer's Remembrancer
46 37
1435
Death
71 62

Thomas was most likely the son of Thomas of Yorkshire, who himself could have been the son of Thomas of Steeton.

To be able to plead later in the court of Exchequer at Westminster, Thomas would have had to have had good schooling, either in York or perhaps even at one of the Inns of Court in London—the universities in those pre-university days (Keen 1990 pp 233-5). He would have been in minor orders—a 'clerk' (l 4 of his appointment as Remembrancer).

Education at the time was divided into levels: grammar, writing, reading and song (Moran 1985 pp 21-62). St Andrew's at Acaster had most if not all of these, but was not founded till c 1470 (Moran 1985 pp 51, 237). There were no schools in Tadcaster till 1446, Nun Appleton till 1489 and Bolton Percy till 1505 (Moran 1985 pp 242, 265, 274). If Thomas was an Appleton or Steeton boy, the nearest school of any kind would have been York. There were several there, including St Leonard's Hospital where Robert Broket had connections.

 

2. Marriage and arms

Back to the top

William Sampson, Lord of the Manor of Southwood in Appleton, would have arranged the marriage of his daughter and heiress Dionisia to Thomas before he died in 1393. Once she inherited Southwood, Thomas Broket became Lord of the Manor in 1393 by right of his wife. The Broket arms—Or a cross flory sable—are an inverse of the Sampsons'—Sable a cross flory or.

Among the disparate group of records known as 'Old Grants' there is no grant or confirmation of arms made to any Broket. Families bearing arms 'time out of mind' did not need such a grant. But up-and-coming men also assumed arms themselves in late medieval times—to do so on one's own initiative in the early 15th C was just as proper as accepting them from a herald (Thrupp 1948 p 307).

Did the earlier Steeton Brokets bear arms, as Harley 807 stated? Did one originally model it on Vescy or Percy overlords? The basic Yorkshire Vescy arms were: Or a cross sable—Broket colours but with a simple cross (Foster 1875 pp 585 Brampton-en-le-Morthen, 56, 146). More specifically, William de Lacell: Sable a cross patonce or, held 2 knight's fees of William de Vescy: Gules a cross patonce argent (Foster 1875 p 25). See also Percehay of Ryton and Barton, Rydal 14-15th C: Argent a cross patonce gules, Argent a cross flory gules (Foster 1875 pp 186, 403, 447, 639; Poulson 1840 p 403.)

William de Vescy ?13th C
William de Lacell ?13th C
Percehay 14-15th C
Gules a cross patonce argent
Sable a cross flory or
Argent a cross flory gules

Or did Thomas assume arms by modifying the Sampson arms:

 
Sampson
Broket
 
Sable a cross flory or
Or a cross flory sable

It is incorrect that Brokets first assumed arms in Hertfordshire (H Andrews 1927 pp 401-2).

The arms are emblazoned in stone in the original external wall over the SE window of Bolton Percy Church and are 'a clear indication that this [Broket] family endowed the Lady Chapel and may even have established a chantry there' (M J Harrison 2000 pp 14, 92). The Church was completed in 1424—about 14 years after Thomas' appointment as Remembrancer—and the outside fabric was not added to later. There are no other arms built into the outside fabric. In those pre-literate days they were a clear visual symbol of Broket lordship and influence. However, while Thomas and Dionisia would have been buried in the Chapel—still called the Brockett Chapel—their great grandson, although the local lord, was buried in churchyard; perhaps their own son too.

In his Visitation of Yorkshire in 1584/5 Glover mentioned the [uncoloured] arms on the external wall: '..., a cross patonce ... This was cutt in stone without the Church' and went on to describe an inscription on a gravestone.

Glover also mentioned 2 other occurrences of Thomas Brockett's arms—Or a cross patonce sablein Bolton Percy Church, one charged with a cinquefoil argent—a five-lobed flower (Foster 1875 p 424). Crosses flory and patonce are little different and commonly interchanged, as with Percehay and Lascelles above. Later in Hertfordshire the Broket cross was usually described as patonce (Burke 1884 p 126). In addition, Glover assigned 2 further arms in the church to Brockett: Gules a fesse between 2 lions passant or and Sable a cross patonce or, rather than to Harwood and Sampson (Foster 1875 p 425).


3. Children

Back to the top


Working in Westminster Thomas was well placed to hear about land availability and attract patronage for his children, and sons Thomas (b bef 1396) and Edward (b bef 1417) are well documented. Thomas and Dionisia would have had other children between, perhaps before and after too. Among them in all likelihood were Parnelle who was working for the Exchequer in 1419 and William (b 1400-1410) who was working for the Exchequer up to 1433. Was John of Hatfield another son?


              Thomas BROKET m bef 1393 Dionisia SAMPSON
 
               _____________|_________________________________
               |        |        |       |          |         |
               |       ?|       ?|       |          |         |
 
Elizabeth m Thomas  Parnelle  William  Lucy m   Elizabeth  Edward m Elizabeth
 
   ASH  no issue                      DALISONE  m HASELRIG        | THWAITES
 
                                                                issue

Harley 807 has 2 Thomases, one dying without issue, and is the source for Lucy. It also places Elizabeth as a child of Thomas and Elizabeth Ash—as also Edward who married Elizabeth Thwaites—i.e. grandchildren of Thomas and Dionisia instead of children. But these were an Elizabethan reconstruction. In 1422 Thomas—the father of Thomas and Edward—was granted all the lands of the late Thomas Hesylrigg of Eslyngton Esq until the lawful age of his son and heir, together with the marriage of the heir. He appears to have married the heir to his daughter.

There is a memorial in Noseley chapel—c 10 m E of Leicester—to Elizabeth and Thomas Hesilrige d 1467, ancestors of the current Lord Hazelrigg. Thomas succeeded to the estates 1434, so would have been b c 1413. Elizabeth was therefore probably b c 1415. There is also a tomb there of Margaret d 1406, daughter of Sir Ralph Hastings and wife of Sir John Blaket, d c 1437 (Hill 1875 pp 179-193; VCH Leicestershire vol 5 p 266). A pedigree in Nichols Leicestershire (vol 2 p 756?) described Elizabeth as daughter and heir of Sir Thomas Broket. It also mistakenly called Sir John Blaket Sir John Broket.

 

4. Life and work in Yorkshire

Back to the top

Thomas is said to have rebuilt Brocket Hall (Harley 807). This accords with its change of name from Southwood.

1399 August. As joint executor with his much older kinsman Nicholas of the will of John Somurby, Priest, Thomas took an oath to prepare an inventory of John's goods and render account to Archbishop Richard Scrope of York (Swanson 1985 p 25; http://www.scroope.net/ancestors/masham/archbishoprichardlescrope.htm)

1403 Thomas was executor of the will of William Barkar of Tadcaster, proved 8 Nov (J Raine et al 1836- vol 1 p 328).

1424 With John and Joan Boteller, Thomas paid the York City Chamberlains 1 mark regarding 2 messuages and 6 bovates of land in Wygynton, Co York, and 12 messuages and 2 gardens in the City (York City Archives E39 Lib Miscellanea vol 8 p 215).

1431 Thomas and Dionisia are recorded in a title deed in the City of York (Rees-Jones 1996 no 4160).

1455 'Thomas Brockett of Bolton Percy' is mentioned in the will of Sir John Stapilton of Wighill as having given John an engraved silver piece with parcel gilt (Chetwynd-Stapylton 1884 p 389).

1458 Thomas and Dionisia are mentioned in a release of lands by their heir Thomas in Nether Acaster, just across the river Ouse from Bolton Percy.

 

5. Attorney at the court of Exchequer

Back to the top

a) General

Date Client Details
21 May 1400
Thomas de Dalby, Archdeacon of Richmond, Yorkshire, as listed in the inventory on his death (Rycraft n d pp 28-9; J Raine et al 1836- vol 3 p 17).
Et Thome Broket de scaccario domini Regis pro diversis ecclesiis et Prioratibus super ipsum pendentibus in eodem scaccario vijli xixs vjd.

'[Owed] to Thomas Broket of the Lord King's exchequer, for divers churches and priories pending upon him in the same exchequer, £7 19s 6d.'

Thomas was therefore working in the Exchequer before 1400.
c 1401
The Abbot of Selby, Yorkshire Gave 60 ash trees to Thomas Brocket c 1401 for pleading on his behalf as his attorney in the court of the Exchequer (Tillotson p 82, misquoting BL Cotton Vit. E.XVI, f 116v).
8 Oct 1404
Westminster (Patent Roll C66/350)
John Santon, clerk and attorney of Langeton, about 10 miles NE of York.
A permit from the king allowing Santon to give John Brokholes and Thomas Broket general power of attorney to collect moneys for him throughout England for a year while he was in Ireland. Either of them could deputise interchangeably. John Brockholes was the king's Clerk of the Signet, later canon and prebend of Boole, York.

From at least 1399 Thomas was working and moving in court circles down in Westminster, often an absentee landlord from his Appleton manor. One imagines he was a frequent visitor to the Archbishop of York's Inn at Westminster (Kingsford 1926 p 138). From 1410-35 he couldn't have effectively fulfilled the role of Remembrancer without being in Westminster much of the time. This was where the lucrative wardships were handed out by the king, and probably where he heard of the FitzSimon heiress and negotiated her marriage to his son.


b) On behalf of Sheriffs and Escheators

The Sheriffs, Escheators and others paid their dues twice a year to the Exchequer. An attorney usually deputised for them. Thomas was Attorney for the Sheriffs of York County and City and Escheators 1398-1410 (King's Remembrancer: Memoranda Rolls and Enrolment Books—PRO E159/186 series). The following entry is typical:

Date/source Latin English translation
1410
E159/186
m 1
1. Aduentus Vicecomitum Escaetorum & aliorum ad Scheccarium ad profra sua facienda ad Crastinum
2. sancti Michaelis Anno Vndecimo Regis Henrici quarti
3. Cumbria ...
4. Northumbria ...
5. Nouum Castrum ...
6. Eboracum Vicecomes videlicet Willelmus Haryngton venit per Thomam Broket attornatum suum & tulit xxx li
7. Ciuitas Eboracum Vicecomites videlicet Iohannes Moreton & Robertus Gamit venerunt per Thomam Broket attornatum suum
8. & tulit de exitibus balliue sue xs
1. The arrival of the Sheriffs, the Escheators and others at the Exchequer to make their proffers on the day after
2. Michaelmas 11 Hen IV (30 Sep 1410)
3. Cumbria: …
4. Northumbria: …
5. Newcastle: …
6. York: The Sheriff, i.e. William Haryngton was represented by Thomas Broket, his attorney, who brought £30.
7. York City: The Sheriffs, i.e. John Moreton and Robert Gamit were represented by Thomas Broket, their attorney,
8. who brought 10s from the revenues of their baileywick.


6. Treasurer's Remembrancer 1410-35

Back to the top

On 6 Jan 1410 Lord Henry Scrope of Masham in Yorkshire became Treasurer of England (Complete Peerage vol 11 pp 564-6). Six months later on 19 June his Remembrancer the Yorkshireman Richard Banks became a Baron of the Exchequer. On 11 July Scrope appointed Thomas Remembrancer (PRO E159/186 Trin m 6):

Original Translation
Angl' De Thoma Broket admisso ad officium Rememoratoris Thesaurarij Anglie


1. Vacante officio Rememoratoris Thesaurarij huius scaccarij modo vndecimo die Iulij hoc termino

2. per cessionem Ricardi Bank' nuper Rememoratoris ibidem modo vnius Baronum eiusdem

3. Scaccarij per dominum Regem constituti / henricus lescrop' chevalier Thesaurarius Anglie ad quem

4. ex antiquo spectat aliquem clericum idoneum ad dictum officium cum vacauerit


5. constituendum predicto vndecimo die Iulij presentauit & constituit Thomam Broket

6. ad dictum officium Rememoratoris hic in scaccario faciendum & exercendum qui ad officium illud

7. admissus est & prestitit sacramentum coram Baronibus huius scaccarij eodem die de bene &


8. fideliter se habendo in officio predicto.
England: Concerning the admission of Thomas Broket to the office of the Treasurer of England's Remembrancer

1. The office of Remembrancer to this Treasurer of the Exchequer being now vacant, 11 July of this term,

2. by the resignation of Richard Banks the former Remembrancer in the same place—now one of the Barons of the same

3. Exchequer having been appointed by the lord king—Henry Le Scrope Knight, Treasurer of England, to whom

4. of old the responsibility belongs of appointing some suitable clerk to the said office when it shall fall vacant,

5. on the aforesaid 11 July presented and appointed Thomas Broket

6. to do and carry out the said office of Remembrancer here in the Exchequer and he to that office

7. was admitted and took his oath in the presence of the Barons of this Exchequer on the same day to well

8. and loyally conduct himself in the aforesaid office.

The annual salary was 40 marks (£26 13s 4d) plus a variable income from fees (Sainty 1983 p 50) and backhanders. Thomas held the post for 25 years till his death.

Others who held this Office became knights—like Robert Lytton, Remembrancer for 20 years 1485-1505 and John Smith Remembrancer for 34 years 1513-47 (Sainty 1983 p 54).

Thomas appears many times in the Memoranda Rolls, especially during his time as Remembrancer.

A very late example is on m 2 of the Recorda section of the roll for 1435, where on 10 Sep that year re Kingston on Hull there were Letters Patent assigning him and William Babthorp to investigate various transactions of the former Sheriff William Ryther. This is strange, as Thomas had died on 13 April 1435. Perhaps it is why these letters were not enrolled—they aren't in the Patent Roll Calendar.

Henry Scrope was executed for treason outside Southampton 5 Aug 1415 and his head was stuck on Mickelgate Bar in York, but Thomas was confirmed in office. In the uncertain political atmosphere of a new under-age king he was seen to be able to do the job.

Thomas was not part of Scrope's circle, or he would have been mentioned in Scrope's will (Nicolas 1832 pp 142-7) and neither he nor any Brokets are recorded as a witness, or in any other capacity, among the Scrope muniments in Westminster Abbey (communication from M Devine 2004). He had done work in 1399 for Scrope's brother Richard, Archbishop of York and was clearly a fellow Yorkshireman, but beyond that Thomas' connection with Henry Scrope is not clear. In 1419 Thomas was given the difficult task of investigating whether Scrope's mother had kept back some of her son's forfeited possessions. Then in 1432-3 Thomas served Scrope's brother during his year as Treasurer.

Thomas served 11 Treasurers—always noblemen—in Westminster (Fryde et al 1986 p 106):

Reign Treasurer Appointment
Henry IV
Henry Scrope lord Scrope of Masham dismissed (and beheaded) 20 Dec 1411
1410, 6 Jan

John Pelham knt
1411, 23 Dec
Henry V
Thomas FitzAlan Earl of Arundel d 13 Oct 1415
1413, 21 Mar

Hugh Mortimer knt (chamberlain of Henry V as prince of Wales) d between 13 Apr and 23 May 1416
1416, 10 Jan

Roger Leche knt dismissed 23 Nov 1416
1416, 17 Apr

Henry FitzHugh lord FitzHugh king's Chamberlain 1413-22
1416, 6 Dec

William Kinwolmarsh (under-Treasurer 1417-21) Dean of St Martin's le-Grand
1421, 26 Feb
Henry VI
William Kinwolmarsh reappointed d 18 Dec 1422
1422, 30 Sep

John Stafford Dean of Wells Bishop of Bath and Wells 1424-43 Chancellor ....
1422, 18 Dec

Walter Hungerford 1st lord Hungerford 1426
1426, 16 Mar

John Scrope lord Scrope of Masham
1432, 26 Feb

Ralph Cromwell lord Cromwell and king's Chamberlain 1432
1433, 11 Aug

The penultimate Treasurer—Sir John Scrope 4th Lord Scrope of Masham—had his Barony restored in 1426 and bought back the Scrope lands confiscated following his brother's execution in 1415 (http://www.scroope.net/ancestors/masham/john4thlordscropeofmasham.htm).

Being Remembrancer to John Scrope must have been difficult:

  • Thomas had earlier had to list all John's brother Henry's confiscated vestments.
  • He had had to pursue their mother for jewelry she had kept back.
  • The case brought by Danvers in 1433 against Thomas' probable own son William was heard before the Lord Chancellor of England in Westminster in the presence of top lords, including the Lord Treasurer of England, John Lord Scrope.

The next Remembrancer to be appointed in the rolls was John Cerf on 8 Nov 1435 (E159/212 m 3d of the Recorda section). The post was vacant because Thomas had died. John had long worked with Thomas as a mainpernor, and already in 1413 was referred to as:

vnum Clericorum Thome Broket vnius remematoris Scaccarij nostri     one of the Clerks of Thomas Broket one of the Remembrancers of our Treasury
(York City Archives E39 Lib Miscellanea vol 8 p 166)

John was probably a member of the long-established Steeton Cerf family.

Corruption

The corruption in the government administration at this time was satirised in a long poem describing the progress of an account through the Exchequer (Haskins and George 1921 pp 58-67). Those needing to be bribed at each step are listed—the Auditor, the Baron, the Chancellor himself—and on line 37 the two Remembrancers are referred to by name. Robert Thresk was King's Remembrancer 1398-1419 and Richard Bank was Treasurer's Remembrancer 1397-1410, dating the poem 1398-1410. Richard Bank was Thomas Broket's immediate predecessor. Ten lines can be singled out (the translation is not literal):

Latin English translation
31. Mente tamen pone quod erit plus grata sequela
32. Si cum barone fiat privata loquela,
33. Baroni cuivis placeas, saltim capitali, ...
36. Placa cum do das memoratoris bene mentem.
37. Thresk Bank ambo duo memoratores recolantur,
38. Ne pro posse tuo vacuis manibus videantur.
39. Ut serves morem per dona placens sis ad illum
40. Cancellatorem quem scis portare sigillum.
31. Realise that the next stage will go a lot better
32. if you have a private discussion with a baron
33. —choose a specially influential one. ...
36. Please the Remembrancer with the verb 'I give...'
37. Look after both Remembrancers, Thresk and Bank;
38. make sure you don't leave their hands empty.
39. To maintain tradition make pleasing gifts to that
40. Chancellor whom you know carries the Seal.

Abuse may have decreased after 1406, when articles for the reform of the government administration were presented to the king by the Commons. The taking of gifts and fees by the Treasurer and the officers of the Exchequer—including 'les deux Remembranciers'—are mentioned in article 15 (Haskins and George 1921 p 65, citing Rot. Parl. iii. 588a). But some of the practices may well have continued during Thomas' office.

 

7. Grants and Mainprises

Back to the top

i. Grants

1400 Jul 16 Westminster
Calendar of Fine Rolls p 71
Commitment (with like clause) to Robert de Malton, clerk, and William Lokton of Heton,—by mainprise of Walter Knoll of the county of Surrey and Thomas Broket of the county of York,—of the keeping of two-thirds of all the lands in the county of York late of Robert Percehay, 'chivaler,' deceased, who held of the king in chief; to hold the same from the time of Robert's death until the lawful age of his heir together with the marriage of the said heir, and so from heir to heir until one of them shall have attained lawful age and the marriage has been effected by them, rendering yearly for the keeping the extent of the said two-thirds, and for the marriage as much as may be agreed upon between them and the treasurer. By bill, of the treasurer.
1402 Feb 20 Westminster
Calendar of Fine Rolls p 153
Commitment to John Rome, clerk, John Staverton, William Rees and Richard de Burgh,—by mainprise of Walter de Waltham of the county of Essex and Thomas Broket of the county of York,—of the keeping of the manor of Fennystanton, co. Huntingdon, late of Thomas late duke of Norfolk; to hold the same from Michaelmas last for as long as the manor shall remain in the king's hand by the death of the said duke and by reason of the minority of Thomas his son and heir, rendering £40 yearly to the king at the Easter and Michaelmas Exchequers and £100 each year to John Moubray, son of the said duke (otherwise called the son of the earl marshal last deceased), for his main- tenance during the minority of Thomas Moubray his brother, by equal portions at Christmas, Easter, Midsummer and Michael- mas; with clause touching maintenance of buildings and support of charges. By bill of the treasurer.
1403 Sep 20 Westminster
Calendar of Fine Rolls p 217
Commitment to Thomas Broket and Thomas Gowere,—by mainprise of Henry Preston of the county of York and John Bever of the county of Lincoln,—of the keeping of all the lands late of John de Cawode of Cawode, tenant of the king in chief; to hold the same from the time of his death until the lawful age of his son and heir, together with the marriage of the said heir, and so from heir to heir until one of them shall have attained lawful age and they shall have effected the marriage, rendering, for the keeping, the extent thereof yearly by equal portions at the Easter and Michaelmas Exchequers, and for the marriage as much as may be agreed upon between them and the treasurer, and finding fit sustenance for the heir; with clause touching maintenance of buildings and support of charges. By bill of the treasurer.
1418 Feb 12 Westminster Calendar of Fine Rolls pp 232-3 Commitment to Thomas Broket,—by mainprise of William Gamell and John Cerf, both of the county of York,—of the keeping of all the lands late of George Salvan and Elizabeth his wife, who held of the king in chief on the days of their death, which have come to the king's hands by the death of the said George and Elizabeth and by reason of the minority of their heir; to hold the same from the time of the death of George until the full age of the said heir, together with the marriage of the heir, and so from heir to heir until one of them shall have attained full age and the marriage shall have been effected, rendering for the keeping and marriage as much as may be agreed upon between him and the treasurer. By bill of William Kynwolmerssh, the treasurer's deputy. Vacated on surrender, since the king on 18 November, 8 Henry V, by letters patent and by a certain mainprise committed the keeping of the said lands to Maud late the wife of Peter de Mauley, 'chivaler,' to hold the same under a certain form. And so these letters are cancelled.
1419 Feb 9 Westminster C66/401 Calendar of Patent Rolls p 213 Commission to Richard Norton, Thomas Broket and Guy Roucliff to enquire into the report that divers goods, jewels, vestments and other things late of Henry Lescrope, 'chivalier', deceased, pertaining to the King on account of his forfeiture, have come to the hands of Margery, dame Lescrope, his mother, and others of the county and city of York (see Pugh 1988 p 117ff).

Thomas received £8 expenses from the Exchequer on 27th October 1419 for safely carrying the goods and jewels from York to London (Devon 1837 p 361; Kingsford 1919 p 81).

Guy Roucliff was an eminent lawyer and local gentleman. He became Recorder of York, the Corporation's chief legal adviser, in the 1450s (Palliser 1979 p 74).

In a Wardrobe Account for 1420-2 (E101/407/5 roll 6 mm 9, 10) there is a long list of goods of the late lord le Scrope which had been received from Thomas Broket. This list no doubt relates to the goods which Scrope's mother had managed to retain for a time. It consists chiefly of rich cloths and vestments (Kingsford 1919 pp 98-9).
1419 Aug 23 Westminster
Calendar of Fine Rolls p 286
Commitment to Thomas Broket and John Presfen [Preston?],—by mainprise of Roger Byrne of the county of York and Simon Yerll of the county of Devon,—of the keeping of the manors of Upsale and Kylvyngton, co. York, and all other lands late of Henry Lescrop, late lord de Masham, in the wapentakes of Bridford and Allertonshire, co. York, which pertain of right to the king by reason of the forfeiture of the said Henry; to hold the same from the time of the death of William Lasyngby (to whom the king lately granted the said manors and lands for life, rent free), for 20 years, rendering yearly the extent thereof, or as much as may be agreed upon between them and the treasurer. By bill of William Kynwolmerssh, the treasurer's deputy.
1420 Nov 18 Westminster Calendar of Fine Rolls pp 358-9 Commitment to Maud late the wife of Peter de Maulay, 'chivaler,'—by mainprise of Marmaduke de Lumley, clerk, and William Mayhu,—of the keeping of all the lands late of George Salvan and Elizabeth his wife, who held of the king in chief on the days of their death, which came to the king's hands by the death of the said George and Elizabeth and by reason of the minority of their heir; to hold the same from the time of the death of the said George until the full age of the said heir, and if the said heir die before attaining full age leaving an heir within age and unmarried, then the said Maud shall have the keeping of all the said lands together with the marriage of such heir, and so from heir to heir until one of the heirs of George and Elizabeth shall have attained full age and Maud shall have effected the marriage, rendering £10 yearly for the keeping at Easter and Michaelmas equally, and paying for the marriage as much as may be agreed upon between her and the treasurer, finding sufficient maintenance for the heir, maintaining the houses and buildings in existence on the lands, and supporting all other charges incumbent thereon: as Thomas Broket has surrendered in the Chancery for cancellation the letters patent of 12 February, 5 Henry V [see 1418 above], by which the king committed to him the keeping of the said lands, together with the marriage of the heir, he rendering for the said keeping and marriage as much as might be agreed upon between him and the treasurer. By bill of William Kynwolmerssh, the treasurer's deputy.
1422 Dec 3 Westminster Calendar of Fine Rolls pp 26-7 Commitment to Thomas Broket,—by mainprise of John Cerff of the county of York and John Santon of the county of Hertford,—of the keeping of all the lands late of Thomas Hesylrigg of Eslyngton, esquire, who held of the king in chief on the day of his death; to hold the same from the time of the death of the said Thomas Hesylrigg until the lawful age of his son and heir, together with the marriage of the said heir, rendering yearly for the keeping of the lands the true extent thereof or as much as may be agreed upon between him and the treasurer, and for the marriage as much as may likewise be agreed upon, and finding fit maintenance for the heir; with clause touching maintenance of houses and buildings, and support of charges. By bill of the treasurer.

No IPM exists, so by his death Thomas held no land in chief.

ii. Mainprises

1405 May 10 Westminster Calendar of Fine Rolls pp 305-6 Commitment to Richard Bank,—by mainprise of Thomas Bank, Thomas Broket and William Hemmyngburgh of the county of York,—of the keeping of Robert son and heir of Robert de Plesyngton, who was the son of Robert de Plesyngton, 'chivaler,' and a tenant of the king in chief, it is said; to hold the same until the lawful age of the said heir together with his marriage and so from heir to heir until the marriage, if it should pertain to the king, shall have been effected, rendering for the marriage as much as may be agreed upon between him and the treasurer. By bill of the treasurer.

Commitment (with like clause) to Richard Bank,—by mainprise of Thomas Bank, Thomas Broket and William Hemmyngburgh of the county of York,—of the keeping of all the lands late of Robert de Plesyngton son of Robert de Plesyngton, knight, who, it is said, held of the king in chief; to hold the same from the time of the death of the said Robert the son until the lawful age of Robert his son and heir, and so from heir to heir until one of them shall have attained full age, rendering the extent thereof yearly by equal portion at Michaelmas and Easter, or as much as may be agreed upon between him and the treasurer, if the keeping should pertain of right to the king, and finding fit sustenance for the heir. By bill of the treasurer.
1405 Jul 4 Westminster Calendar of Fine Rolls p 313 Commitment to John Beauver and William Bereford,—by mainprise of Thomas Broket of the county of York and Richard Denton of the county of Leicester,—of the keeping of (1) a moiety of a messuage and 5 acres of land in Barkeby, co. Leicester, which is in the king's hand by the forfeiture which the vicar of Barkeby made thereof by appropriating the same to himself and his church without the king's licence, and (2) a messuage and certain lands in Knoston, co. Leicester, which are in the king's hand by the forfeiture of John Hilton of Knoston, outlawed for felony; to hold the same from Easter last for as long as the premises shall remain in the king's hand for the causes aforesaid, rendering yearly by equal portions at the Michaelmas and Easter Exchequers the 4s. for which answer was made to the king for the said lands, and an increment of 4d.; with clause touching maintenance of buildings and support of charges. By bill of the treasurer.
1422 Jul 17 Westminster Calendar of Fine Rolls p 437 Commitment to John Cerff,—by mainprise of Thomas Broket and John Aglyon, both of the county of York,—of the keeping of all the lands late of Thomas Hebbourne, who held of the king in chief on the day of his death; to hold the same from the time of the death of Thomas until the lawful age of John his son and heir, together with the marriage of the heir, and so from heir to heir until one of them shall have attained full age, and the marriage shall have been effected, rendering for the keeping and marriage aforesaid as much as may be agreed upon between him iand the treasurer, and finding fit maintenance for the heir; with clause touching maintenance of houses, enclosures and buildings, and support of charges. By bill of the treasurer. [See 1423 below.]
1423 Dec 3 Westminster
Calendar of Patent Rolls p 157
The king's father on 17 July, 10 Henry V, by letters patent, by manucaption of Thomas Brokel (sic) and John Agylon, both of the county of York, committed to John Cerff the custody of all the lands and tenements which belonged to Thomas Hebbourne, deceased, tenant in chief of the king's said father, from the date of the death of the said Thomas, during the minority of John, his son and heir, together with the marriage of the same John, and in the event of his dying a minor leaving an heir under age, the said John Cerff was to have the custody and marriage of such heir, and so from heir to heir till one attained his age and the said John Cerff had realised such marriage, paying to the king's said father for the said custody and marriage a sum to be agreed on with the treasurer of England. The said John Cerff has now surrendered the above grant to the intent that Thomas Holden, esquire, should have the said custody by grant of the present king, who grants it to him accordingly, on the like terms, he to pay for it and the marriage, 11 marks in hand. [See 1422 above.]

iii. Enfeoffments

1430 4 Mar Windsor (Eton College Records, vol 13 pt 2: Index to Windsor Deeds nos 701-950, no 753) Enfeoffment by Robert Bolley of New Windsor Squier of all his lands and tenements in New Windsor to Thomas Broket, John Agelyon, William Boucher of Cobrook, Robert Prycke yeoman, Nicolas Walton, Philip Parker, citizen and bowyere of London and William Malthom. [Thomas would have been styled 'the younger'—as in the 1419-22 complaint about properties in Wycombe—if his son had been the feoffee here.]

 

8. Death and burial

Back to the top

Thomas died 13 April 1435 and was buried in Bolton Percy Church; Dionisia 2 years later. In his Visitation of Yorkshire in 1584/5 Glover described an inscription on a gravestone, which was still in the Church in 1641 according to Drake (Foster 1875 p 425, retaining the editor's transliteration; Drake 1736 p 386; Speight 1902 p 120):

Hic jacet Thomas Brockett, et Dionisia, uxor ejus, qui quidem Thomas, obiit xiii. die Aprilis, Ao Dni. mccccxxxv., praedictaque Dionisia, obiit xiv. April., Ano Dni. mccccxxxvii. Here lies Thomas Broket and Dionisia his wife. Thomas died 13 April 1435 and Dionisia died 14 April 1437.

No will has been found. York wills are lost 1408-17 and 1418-26 (Moran 1985 p 231).